⏰ 3-5 minutes 🍸 Classic 💰 Affordable 🏃‍♀️ Medium Drink Speed

Eggnog – You either love it or hate it! History has it that the word ‘eggnog’ derives from an Old English word for strong beer.

This is likely derived from a drink called posset from around the 13th Century where medieval monks in Britain drank a warm ale punch curdled with eggs and spices and was used as a flu remedy.

A 17th century recipe is much similar to the modern eggnog recipe and uses a heated mixture of cream, whole cinnamon, mace, nutmeg, eighteen egg yolks, eight egg whites, and one pint of fortified white wine. It was a popular drink among the aristocracy as Milk, eggs, and sherry were foods of the wealthy, so eggnog was often used in toasts to prosperity and good health.

Why not check out some of our other easy festive cocktail and drink recipes.

Serves around: 4 – 5

Ingredients

  • 2 x Eggs
  • 50g Caster Sugar
  • 160ml of Whole Milk
  • 130ml of Double Cream
  • 120ml of Rum or Bourbon
  • Grated Nutmeg

Eggnog Cocktail Recipe

  1. Whisk the egg yolks in a bowl with around 2/3 of the caster sugar until the mixture is pale yellow and thick (this is best done with an electric handheld mixer).
  2. Stir in the milk, double cream, and the rum (or bourbon). You can also add a little grated nutmeg as well, if you want to add a little more flavour.
  3. Whisk the egg whites until foamy and then add the remainder of the sugar and whisk the egg whites until soft peaks form when the whisk is removed.
  4. Pour the egg yolk, cream and rum mixture into a large bowl and fold in the egg whites until well combined.
  5. Ladle the egg nog into glass tumblers and serve with a little freshly grated nutmeg over the top of each glass.
  6. Sip and Enjoy!
IngredientVolumeUnitsPrice
Egg2 Medium Eggs0.00£0.44
Caster Sugar
50g0.00£0.07
Whole Milk6 & 1/2 x shots (160ml)0.00£0.07
Double Cream5 & 1/2 x shots (130ml)0.00£0.46
Rum4 & 1/2 x shots (120ml)4.50£1.94
NutmegLight Grating0.00£0.03
510ml4.50£3.01 ($3.82* €3.52*)

*Based off Open Exchange Rates from GBP total.

Photo by Matthew Henry on Burst